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National News
  • Lynch inherits civil rights probes from Holder as U.S. attorney general

    Lynch testifies during her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to become U.S. attorney general on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A string of deadly confrontations between mostly white police and black men will be among challenges immediately facing Loretta Lynch when she is sworn in on Monday as U.S. attorney general. Lynch, 55, takes over as the country's top law enforcement official after a weekend that saw thousands of people in Baltimore, Maryland, take to the streets in mostly peaceful protests over the latest such case. Building on her career as an accomplished federal prosecutor, Lynch takes over from retiring Attorney General Eric Holder, who served more than six turbulent years at the head of the Justice Department. Besides the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, other questionable encounters between police and black males in recent months have led to unrest in South Carolina, Missouri, Ohio and New York.


  • Albuquerque police seek martial arts champ over hit-and-run
    (Reuters) - Police in Albuquerque, New Mexico, want to question mixed martial arts star Jon Jones over his possible involvement in a hit-and-run accident early on Sunday in which a pregnant woman was hurt, authorities said. The pregnant woman in her 20s was taken to hospital with minor injuries, the Albuquerque Police Department said. "Officers attempted to contact Mr. Jones at his residence Sunday evening, but were unsuccessful," the police department said in a statement.
  • Increased human protections offered as H5N2 outbreak spreads

    An egg-producing chicken farm run by Sunrise Farm is seen in HarrisBy P.J. Huffstutter and Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Hundreds of farm workers exposed to a highly pathogenic strain of bird flu have been offered antiviral medication as a preventative measure in recent days, U.S. public health officials said. To date, the virulent H5N2 influenza, which has infected turkeys and chickens on Midwestern poultry farms, has not affected humans. Dr. Alicia Fry, a medical officer in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?s influenza division, said that while health officials are cautiously optimistic that humans will not be affected, her agency has isolated a pure strain of the H5N2 virus for potential use in a human vaccine, should one be needed. Concerns about human health risk have prompted investigators to ramp up biosecurity measures on infected farms, with some government staff overseeing the culling of birds wearing full protective body suits and ventilators.


  • Rescuers struggle to reach remote Nepal areas as earthquake death toll rises

    Rescuers struggle to reach remote Nepal areas as earthquake death toll risesThe death toll from Nepal's earthquake soared past 3,700 Monday, and how much higher it would rise depended largely on the condition of vulnerable mountain villages that rescue workers were still struggling to reach two days after the disaster.


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